lekswinterisdyslexic:

danplasmius:

gender-ikari:

harpyholidays:

bookerdewitt:

antique-arthur:

the-fact-rat:

The more I learn about Satanism, the less horrendous it seems. Not even kidding.

That’s cause non-theistic Satanism is more about worshipping yourself and sorta treating others how you want to be treated etc

hail satan

satanism is actually really solid like the Fifth Satanic Rule of the Earth says not to make sexual advances unless you are given consent 

satan seems like a pretty nice guy

This week on “I didn’t know I was a Satanist”

Wait till you hear the Nine Satanic Sins
1. Stupidity
2. Pretentiousness
3. Solipsism
4. Self-deceit
5. Herd conformity
6. Lack of perspective
7. Forgetfulness of past orthodoxies
8. Counterproductive pride
9. Lack of aesthetics
That’s right. If you ain’t got no style, you be sinning.

lekswinterisdyslexic:

danplasmius:

gender-ikari:

harpyholidays:

bookerdewitt:

antique-arthur:

the-fact-rat:

The more I learn about Satanism, the less horrendous it seems. Not even kidding.

That’s cause non-theistic Satanism is more about worshipping yourself and sorta treating others how you want to be treated etc

hail satan

satanism is actually really solid like the Fifth Satanic Rule of the Earth says not to make sexual advances unless you are given consent 

satan seems like a pretty nice guy

This week on “I didn’t know I was a Satanist”

Wait till you hear the Nine Satanic Sins

1. Stupidity

2. Pretentiousness

3. Solipsism

4. Self-deceit

5. Herd conformity

6. Lack of perspective

7. Forgetfulness of past orthodoxies

8. Counterproductive pride

9. Lack of aesthetics

That’s right. If you ain’t got no style, you be sinning.

wheresagnes:

aztec-princesss:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

*runs to target- i need to get my babydoll one for her 1st bday

ohmygosh and the one from Ethiopia has natural hair which you can’t get from the American Girl “just like you” dolls!

airyairyquitecontrary:

thenotsosilentmonk:

deducecanoe:

reservoircat:

Mutant 101 - Professor Xavier Should Put In A Call To Her Parents - 5 Year Old Mia Stares Down marvelentertainment's Cast Of Guardians Of The Galaxy As She Crushes Them In A Game Of GotG Trivia On jimmykimmellive [X

Vin Diesel in the background looking at her like “SHE’S PERFECT.  WANT ONE.”

I thought girls didn’t like Super Heroes.

You thought what? 

Also, bless five-year-old girls who can confidently pronounce the words ‘cybernetic enhancements’ because they’re so interested in superhero adventures that they saw no obstacle to learning anything at all to understand them better.

And can do it wearing a pink flower headband, if they feel like it.

GIRLS LIKE SUPERHEROES. GIRLS LIKE COMICS. GIRLS HAVE LIKED THESE THINGS FOR AS LONG AS THEY HAVE BEEN AVAILABLE TO LIKE. 

image

(behold, three girls and one boy avidly reading new comic books in New York City, 1947, photographed by Ruth Orkin)

What girls don’t like is when they’re patronised, and herded towards titles designed according to what grown men think girls are supposed to like, and ignored with regard to titles that those men assume are just for boys and men. What girls don’t like is not being allowed to choose for themselves what they like. 

This is not a new concept. This is noted in Chaucer. What every woman most desires is to choose her own way.

Each main Legend of Korra villain represents a different political ideology.

Even the more minor villains like Varrick (who is not always necessarily a villain) and the Earth Queen represent ideologies as well:  Capitalism and Monarchy, respectively.